Forum Index

 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Other great country guitarists???
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic     Forum Index -> Other Pickers
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
jakerock



Joined: 20 Apr 2007
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Fri Apr 20, 2007 10:01 pm    Post subject: Other great country guitarists??? Reply with quote

Hello all...
Totally into Clarence whites steel guitar country style...
Looking for reccomendations as to other guitarists who play in a similar style...
Or just players that you love!!!

Thanks very much!

Jason L
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
jakerock



Joined: 20 Apr 2007
Posts: 5

PostPosted: Sat Apr 21, 2007 12:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry, should have poked around here a little more before asking this question...

Still interested if you all have any opinion on great players to check out.

Thanks,
Jason
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Bob Warford



Joined: 24 Aug 2006
Posts: 96

PostPosted: Sat Apr 21, 2007 2:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

For what it's worth (no reference to Steven Stills intended), Clarence and I both had great respect for James Burton's playing, and on one occasion, all three of us (James, Clarence, and I) sat in at the same club in North Hollywood. Clarence predicted that night that James would blow both of us off the stage, and whether the audience thought so or not, we both thought he did. The interesting part was that James did what he did by applying pure taste and timing, not by playing more notes per second than anyone else could do, as often seems to be the aim of many players. Years after Clarence was killed, James and I played dual lead guitar positions with Emmylou Harris and the Hot Band. JB's minimalist playing, perfect timing, and great tone still gives me chills, when I listen to old recordings.

You obviously can't go wrong listening to Clarence's innovative work on electric and acoustic guitar. You also can't go wrong absorbing a bit of James Burton's exquisite taste and sense of placement.

There are a lot of great players out there, to the point where, in my view, anybody who plays music professionally can never afford to take themselves too seriously. John Jorgenson has come as close as anyone I' e ever heard to mastering Gypsy jazz guitar in the style of Django Reinhardt (who Clarence and I both revered). Richard Smith may be the best fingerpicking guitarist I've heard. Grady Martin, now deceased, was one of the greatest players of all time, who strongly influenced Clarence and me, and Grady's playing on Marty Robbins recordings was a source for Clarence when he recorded with the Gosdin Brothers. The list goes on and on...

The point is, as you think about Clarence's "steel guitar" style, the basis for most of that style was not dependent on the bender, or pullstring, or whatever anyone wants to call it. It was based in a sense of taste, and a unique use of time, playing both before and after the beat, generating fluidity, tension, and timely resolution of that tension, that came from many other influences.

Absorbing some of those same influences is never a bad idea...


Bob Warford
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
john bodle



Joined: 27 Mar 2007
Posts: 59
Location: crosby,mn

PostPosted: Sat Apr 21, 2007 3:31 pm    Post subject: other great guitarists' Reply with quote

Got to say that Mr. Warford is also up there among the greats and very worthy of studying. I am sensing he is wayyyyyy too much of a gentleman to toot his own horn, so I jumped at the chance!!. Please check out the 'silver threads and golden needles " on the u tube link " I respectfully submit that a break like that needs jaw support on behalf of the user!! I think it may have caused me TMJ, But doesn't seem to effect my pickin' hand so far. thanks Bob!!!!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
telemetric



Joined: 19 Oct 2006
Posts: 38
Location: seattle

PostPosted: Tue Apr 24, 2007 5:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have to admit that I bought the Roy Orbison Black and White video mainly because I wanted to watch James Burton in action. I am amazed by his cascading open-string licks that he uses with as much ease as people use basic pentatonic licks. I have promised myself that I will transcribe every one of these eventually. Burton's chicken pickin is so cool and funky, too!
As for Bob...to have had gigs as mighty as Emmylou's and Linda Ronstadt...outstanding for musical, historic, and I am sure, weird and funny stories.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Brian



Joined: 22 Aug 2006
Posts: 1361
Location: Southern California

PostPosted: Tue Apr 24, 2007 5:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Jerry Hayes



Joined: 25 Aug 2006
Posts: 57
Location: Virginia Beach, Va.

PostPosted: Mon Apr 30, 2007 4:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My favorite pick for "country" guitarist would have to be AL BRUNO. I played the old club scene in SoCal for over twenty years (mostly in Orange country or Long Beach) and Al was the premier picker and influence on a lot of players of the era (sixties, seventies, eighties). He wasn't as well known as Clarence or James but it wasn't because of lack of chops, ability, etc. Al could (and did) play anything he wanted to. He first came to national prominence in his early twenties as lead guitarist with Conway Twitty in Conway's rock and roll years. He later became musical director with Dick Clark in some Cavelcade of Stars show. When Dick moved his operations to Los Angeles he offered Al a position out there so he moved his family to the LA area. Getting back to his playing, I remember the days when he would play the afterhours clubs, either the Imperial Inn or the Aces Club, and the place would be full of lead guitarists watching his every move. In Pete Anderson's interview in Guitar Player magazine (when he made a splash as Dwight Yoakum's lead player), he mentioned Al in the interview and his unique ablility and influence. Pete mentioned how Al was able to use the hybrid technique so well. I've seen him do things that only a finger picker should be able to do. He'll get a line going on the high strings with his fingers and a counterpoint riff going with his flatpick at the same time. He's also a very accomlished bender player using the Bigsby Palm Pedal. He was the first I ever saw use that device and the one who got me hooked on them. If you'd like to hear a little of his playing go to his website which is: www.brunobearmusic.com and you'll hear "Bear Country" playing in the background. Al has a new CD called "Bear Country" which is available from the site also. Al's been a friend of mine for many years and even if I didn't know him, he'd still be my all time guitar hero. He always took the time to show anyone anything he knew and was the only player I've really ever known who had no enemies. Everyone loved him and still does to this day. He's currently residing and working out of Las Vegas..........JH in Va.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Matt



Joined: 23 Aug 2006
Posts: 183
Location: St Louis, MO

PostPosted: Mon Apr 30, 2007 6:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bob Warford wrote:

You obviously can't go wrong listening to Clarence's innovative work on electric and acoustic guitar. You also can't go wrong absorbing a bit of James Burton's exquisite taste and sense of placement.

Bob Warford


Great post Bob!

This past Saturday, my local NPR station aired a show from American Routes that had an entire segment with James Burton. He was in-studio with his guitar. It was really cool to hear him talk about...then play some of the "signature" licks that he played on some of those classic records.

Some of the intros/fills/breaks that he played are what is instantly recognizable about some of those tunes for me.

-Matt
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
OdNt43



Joined: 16 Mar 2007
Posts: 10
Location: Meaford, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2007 1:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

All the guitarists mentioned above are top notch.

I'd like to add a few who seldom get much mention any more...and I'm adding them not so much for technical prowess or speed, but because of what they brought (and left for us all) in terms of a distinctive and recognizable sound or style of their own:

Don Rich of Buck Owens' Buckaroos
Roy Nichols of Merle Haggard's Strangers
Luther Perkins of Johnny Cash's Tennessee Two (& Three)
...and Buck Owens himself, a great session man and soloist in his early years.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Karl Teten



Joined: 23 Aug 2006
Posts: 48
Location: California

PostPosted: Sun May 13, 2007 8:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Porter Wagoner sidemman Buck Trent was/is a great player.

I have often wondered if Clarence got the idea for doing steel bends and using banjo tuners from Buck Trent. Trent was pulling off pedal steel style bends with his tuners on electric banjo as far back as 1962.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P6DU36BO4VA&mode=related&search=

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=04b2xLd5O1Q&mode=related&search=

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QroiTfax3X4

Buck backing Del Reeves;

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e5T4oqPoFzE

Buck - early 70's;

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D_s_YkxR2LI
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
PeeWee



Joined: 04 Dec 2006
Posts: 79
Location: Montclair, VA

PostPosted: Sun May 13, 2007 2:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm also a big Don Rich guy; what a great player! Roy Nichols is another monster picker and Luther was a big inspiration to me as a kid. Simplistic genius!

Remember when Buck Trent went electric with his banjo? You'd have thought that he'd joined the Communist Party and burned the flag from all the negative responses. Not such a big deal these days. I also remember when Earl Scruggs grew his hair out and started playing in an electric vein with his son Randy. We had the LP at the house that featured him doing a bunch of Dylan tunes and had him pictured on the back jacket in front of that wall of Fender amps; too cool!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
PeeWee



Joined: 04 Dec 2006
Posts: 79
Location: Montclair, VA

PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2007 7:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A couple of other guys that I really like quite a lot - although they may not be considered "pure" country pickers - are Jimmy Rivers and two guys from the Wills band; Junior Barnard and Eldon Shamblin. And what list would be complete w/o a mention of Jimmy Bryant?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
OdNt43



Joined: 16 Mar 2007
Posts: 10
Location: Meaford, Ontario, Canada

PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2007 12:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Karl...glad you mentioned Buck Trent...a real innovator.
The "pedal steel" bender for banjo was his all right.

The tuners were an Earl Scruggs innovation though...made famous on "Flint Hill Special' and "Foggy Mountain Breakdown"...the earliest home-made Scruggs tuners that Earl made were HUGE.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
bossaroo



Joined: 25 Aug 2006
Posts: 92
Location: FL/NC/CostaRica

PostPosted: Wed May 30, 2007 2:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Earl used those tuners on "Earl's Breakdown" and "Randy Lynn Rag" among others.

another outstanding player is Phil Baugh... no longer with us unfortunately.
Phil played on a couple of Merle Haggard's early hits: "Swinging Doors" and/or "The Bottle Let Me Down." Most people just assume it's James or Roy.

Phil played on a lot of Nashville sessions too, including "He Stopped Loving Her Today" by George Jones. he uses his benders to great effect on that one.

Phil developed a 6-pedal rack that connected to his guitar and pulled all 6 strings. (his low E dropped a full 2-1/2 steps... down to B!!!)

he did a lot of jazzier things with steel players like Buddy Emmons and Maurice Anderson. there was a lot of Jimmy Bryant in his playing, and he really helped blaze the Bakersfield sound, had a totally unique voice on his benders, and did some insane chicken-picking too.

here's some CLASSIC footage of Phil!
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Mur



Joined: 22 Aug 2006
Posts: 377

PostPosted: Fri Jul 13, 2007 5:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow ..just found this post and to reiterate ...Clarence, Warford and Burton. And on bender, Clarence and Warford. It's that simple.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic     Forum Index -> Other Pickers All times are GMT
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group